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The Seven Cemeteries of Underhill

Explore Underhills' burial grounds
Our past can be recalled by a simple stroll through any one of Underhills' seven cemeteries. Learn more by expanding the blocks below to view histories of each location, photos, and maps that can guide you to each cemetery. Some data is still being added so be sure to check back soon for a complete listing of information.
Underhill Center Cemetery | 1821 | River Rd.

by Elizabeth Weichel Moore 

Underhill Center was emerging as a village center with a store and a sawmill. New settlers from New Hampshire of the Methodist Episcopal persuasion built a meetinghouse and the new local cemetery served their needs. The earliest burial appears to be 1824. The last burial is dated 1921. Neglected for some time, The Underhill Center Cemetery has been maintained for many years by members of the Hanaford Fife and Drum Corps. The corps is named for the young drummer, Nathanial Hanaford, who served in the War of 1812 and is buried in the cemetery. (The cemetery is often referred to as the 'Hanaford Cemetery). Recently the Select board of the Town of Underhill installed a fine new wood fence around the property.

 

Facts

1821 (vol.6 p 115) David Goodhue (M.E. minister d.1837) deeds 1/2 acre to Town of Underhill for a burying ground. (Is actually ~ 1A.).


Earliest Burial: 1824 ? 
Most Recent Burial: Lewis D. Melvin 1921 

 


 

Photos

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Contact Information

Town of Underhill Selectboard

 


 

Map

Pleasant Valley Cemetery | 1813 | Deane Rd.

by Elizabeth Weichel Moore 

The small private, non-denominational cemetery on Deane Road, known as the Pleasant Valley Cemetery, has served the nearby residents of Underhill and Cambridge since the land was first deeded by the Shanley family in 1813. It is managed by the voluntary 'Pleasant Valley Cemetery Association'. Andy Butler was the cemetery sexton and caretaker for many decades. The cemetery was enlarged by a gift of 1/4 acre from James Forgan in 1978 and is in use today.

 

Facts

Additional land ( 1/4 A ) deeded from James Forgan c. 1978? (vol.p) 

Original Deed: Shanley c. 1813 (vol. p ) 
Early Burials: Melissa Melvin 1813; Laura Richardson 1814; Dickinson infant 1826; Ephraim Lewis 1838 
 

 

Photos

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Contact Information

Pleasant Valley Cemetery Association 
2539 Upper Plasant Valley Road
Cambridge, VT
Phone: (802) 644-6603

 


 

Map

Underhill Cemetery | 1838 | Park Street

by Elizabeth Weichel Moore 

In 1827 the Creek Rd (now Route 15) was surveyed and laid out and it replaced the Hill Road as the County road. The center of gravity was shifting in the Town as the area known as Underhill Flatts along the Creek Rd was growing with commerce and industry. The historic Birge Tavern (now PH271) near the Congregational Meeting House on the Hill Road, which had been a gathering place and the location for Town Meetings, was replaced by the Barney Tavern ( across from the present UJFD) on the new County road. In 1832 it was formally voted to hold the Underhill Town Meetings at William Barney's Tavern. 
The prime movers in the Flatts were the entrepreneurs, John Towers and Henry Oakes, who owned considerable land and had a thriving general store. In 1837 John Towers laid out part of his land for a burial ground and sold lots. In 1838 a "Second Congregational Society" was organized to manage the financial affairs of the Congregational Church and to decide what to do about the original meeting house on the 'Hill Rd' which had been severely wind-damaged and was unusable. Tower and Oakes leased to said Society a lot next to their store in the Flatts on which to build a new meetinghouse.
The same year John Towers also deeded his vacant cemetery lots to the same Second Congregational Society. So began The Underhill Cemetery on what is now Park Street. At a yearly meeting a sexton and treasurer were elected for the cemetery care and management. (The cemetery has headstones with dates as early as 1809, which precede the 1837 establishment date.) A structure known as the River Church, which had been located somewhere near the intersection of Sand Hill and River Road, was moved to the new lot next to the Tower and Oakes store. It replaced the wind-damaged original meetinghouse until 1845, when it was damaged by fire. By 1847 The First Congregational Church building had been erected on the same lot by the store and next to the village green .
It is a fine structure which now serves The United Church of Underhill. (Some of the original founders of the 'Congregational Church of Christ in Underhill undertook to salvage parts from their wind-damaged meetinghouse and use them to build a meetinghouse farther up the Hilt Road, - - near the present intersection of Poker Hill and Page Roads. It was known as North Church and the members actually seceded from the parent church. Shortly thereafter, that building also burned and the few remaining church members rejoined The First Congregational Church in the new building in the Flatts.
Over the years more land along was acquired for the enlargement of the Underhill Cemetery. Along the way The Second Congregational Society was reconstituted as The Congregational Society. Then in 1916 The Congregational Society and The First Congregational Church merged with a new constitution.

Facts

Some data is still being added to cemetery information, check back soon for a complete listing of information.


Earliest Burial:  
Most Recent Burial: 

 


 

Photos

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Contact Information

Underhill Cemetery Association
 

 

Map

North Underhill Cemetery | 1807 | Poker Hill Rd.

North Underhill Cemetery Underhill Vermont

by Elizabeth Weichel Moore 

1763 Town of Underhill chartered 
1787 Earliest settlers (near present Cook and Covey Rds) Caleb Sheldon had first deed. Daughter Mary first born in town in 1787 Col Udney Hay - -Revolutionary War veteran (represented Town from 1798-1804) Log schoolhouse built near home of Abner Eaton 
1791 Hill Rd surveyed and laid out.
1795 Town of Underhill organized 
1799 "Burying Ground of the Town of Underhill" 1 1/4 A. deeded in February by Udney Hay to 'proprietors' ; deed signed by William Barney, moderator and Peter Martin, clerk. At meeting in March, the committee, including Caleb Sheldon and Dexter Ward , voted to collect obligations ( 6 bushels and 1 peck of wheat) and put them to best advantage of proprietors. 
1800 New settlers from Connecticut establish hamlet halfway up the hill near present cemetery. 1801 'Congregational Society in Underhill' established. Meetings held in Birge Tavern (Brewer). 1802 Proprietors meeting refers to 'North Burying Ground'. 
1803 North Burying Ground of the Town of Underhill surveyed. Was along the road and adjacent to Hay property. Now ( Jan. 2003) Francis Russin PH365. 
1804 At March meeting subscribers agree that by Dec 1, 1806 a board fence would be erected around the burying ground to be kept in good repair. 
1807 Bernard Ward ( Louella Lamphere's great, great, great grandfather) leased 1 Acre of Lot 31, 1st Division ( original right of' Cornelius Law) to the Underhill Congregational Society' to build a meeting house . (Pay yearly lease of 1 ear of Indian com.) Among signers were William Barney and Eliphas Thrall. Vol. p . 
(Meetinghouse was next to present N Underhill cemetery. Supposedly the old steps are in the cemetery wall.) 
1806 Col Udney Hays dies. After large Burlington funeral, body returned to Underhill farm for burial. (Gravestone is in Poker Hill Cemetery.) 
1807 Bernard Ward leased 1 acre of land to the Town of Underhill for a burying ground. ( On west side of highway leading from Underhill meeting house to Jericho. In lot 31 I st Division, right of Cornelius Law.) Signed by Selectmen Caleb Sheldon, Eliphas Thrall, Peter Martin. ( Deed not recorded until 1/1/1813 vol.4 p.298.). 
1897 Jason Rogers deeds to Selectmen I acre ofland known as 'The North Underhill Burying Ground', now 'North Underhill Cemetery' (vol. 25 p.205). Note: There is no mention of the' North Burying Ground' on the Hay property or proprietors' meetings after 1806. The Hay farm later was owned by Thomas Jackson. and it is said that during that ownership the burial ground was abandoned and gravestones, if not bodies, were moved to the Town burying ground, 'The North Underhill Cemetery'. Along with the gravestone for Colonel Hay, there other stones with earlier dates than 1807: 1797 Mrs Patty Martin; 1801 C. Thrall; 1806 Udney Hay; 1808 H. Brown. 

1911 After many years of neglect, the Town cemetery on Poker Hill Rd was taken over by a group of concerned citizens. The 'North Underhill Cemetery Association' was formed by Fillmore Robinson - to oversee the maintenance. 


 

Facts

Some data is still being added to cemetery information, check back soon for a complete listing of information.


Earliest Burial:  
Most Recent Burial: 

 


 

Photos

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North Underhill Cemetery Underhill VermontPhoto Credit: Keith R DesRoches 2016

 

Contact Information

The North Underhill Cemetery Association
President
Kayla James   |   802-453-3401   |   kmjames89@gmail.com 
 
Vice President
Kyle James   |   802-343-1156   |   kylenort@hotmail.com
 
Trustees
Phillip Cook   |   802-899-9928   |   phgarden@together.net
Carol Morse   |   802-878-5615   |   caroljmorse@comcast.net
Timothy Murad   |   802-899-3947   |   timothy.murad@uvm.edu
 
Secretary
Richard James   |   802-453-3401   |   rjames@middlebury.edu
 
Treasurer
Randy H. Clark   |   802-899-3753 x105   |   honorarychief@aol.com
 
Co/Sextons
Randy H. Clark   |   802-373-4692   |   honorarychief@aol.com
Timothy Murad   |   802-899-3947   |   timothy.murad@uvm.edu

 


 

Map

Doran Cemetery | 1846 | Pleasant Valley Rd.

Doran Cemetery Underhill Vermont 05489

GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN: THE DORAN CEMETERY 

By Scott A. McLaughlin
 

(Some data is still being added to cemetery information, check back soon for a complete listing of information.)
INTRODUCTION
In Underhill, Vermont, a historic resource is slowly being destroyed. The layout, form, and landscape of a small Irish Catholic cemetery are being transformed by both natural and human events. The headstones, fences, vegetation, and topography of the cemetery are being altered. Without the documentation of these important changes, a phase in the history of the cemetery will be lost. One cannot prevent change; therefore, we must compile historical documents and the visible evidence of the landscape in an effort to better understand the processes that shape our world. Through observations and historical research, we hope to gain a better understanding of how the cemetery came to be, why it has been abandoned, and who is buried there. 

THE FOUNDING AND ABANDONMENT OF THE DORAN CEMETERY 
A small Irish-Catholic cemetery often referred to as the "Catholic Cemetery on the Valley Road," the "Pleasant Valley Cemetery," or the "Doran Cemetery" is located on the Pleasant Valley Road in Underhill. According to the headstones, the cemetery served the needs of this small mountainous community from 1847 until 1878. Patrick Doran donated the plot of land, which the cemetery occupies today, to the Rt. Rev. Bishop Fenwick of Boston, Massachusetts. The land was to be used for a Catholic Church and cemetery to serve the needs of the growing Irish-Catholic communities in the Irish Settlement and the Pleasant Valley areas (Luck 1970:15). The date of the transfer was September 1, 1846 (The J. J. Ryder Company 1899:9).
The population of Underhill in 1791 was sixty-five; by 1800, it had reached 212 (Dwyer 76:3); and by 1840, 1441 people lived in town. The steady increase in the number of inhabitants of Underhill continued throughout the early nineteenth century as a result of the thriving local lumber and agricultural industries. 
The Irish Settlement Cemetery, located on Irish Settlement Road, was another Catholic cemetery in use at the same time as the Doran Cemetery. The Irish Settlement community also had hoped that a Catholic Church would stand beside their cemetery. Together the cemetery and church would serve the Catholic community of Underhill (Luck 1970:15). From the headstones in the Irish Settlement Cemetery, it appears that it was first used in 18311.  A church was never built on the former Doran property or near the Irish Settlement Cemetery.
In 1856, Rt. Rev. Bishop Louis DeGoesbriand of the new diocese of Burlington decided that the St. Thomas Church would be built in "Union Village' or Underhill Center as it is known today (Dwyer 1976: 11 ). In 1873, the land was purchased by the St. Thomas Parish on Range Road to serve as the Catholic cemetery.
Although the St. Thomas and Irish Settlement cemeteries are still in use today, the Doran Cemetery was abandoned after 1878. The soil and topography may have played a part in the narrow valley, Pleasant Valley, which is between the crest of the Green Mountains and a small parallel ridge called "Macomber Mountain." The cemetery is surrounded on the north, south, and east sides by a hay field and a forest on the west. The cemetery is about 3.5 miles from Underhill Center and 2.8 miles from the Underhill/Cambridge town line. 
The area does not seem like the best place for a cemetery or a church. The right of way to the lot goes through a low spot in the hay field that is very wet during the spring and fall of the year. The land is very rough with bedrock and boulders penetrating the surface. The surface is covered with small depressions and mounds due to animal burrows, ant hills, decomposed trees, tree throws, cattle grazing in the cemetery, rocks being moved out of the cemetery to make up the stonewalls, and vehicles being driven into the cemetery. It is possible that some of these depressions may be unmarked graves. The trees and brush have been recently cut down on the east side of the lot, but still remain in piles within the cemetery. The west side of the cemetery remains wooded. 
LAYOUT OF THE CEMETERY 
The upper terrace has two rows of graves with six headstones each. The lower terrace consists of one row with two standing headstones. All the headstones are facing east toward Mount Mansfield. Thirteen families are represented in the cemetery: Beirne/Bums, Carney, Doran, Duffy, Ellsworth, Gill, Kelley, McGlynn, McMannus, McNulty, Nugant, Wall, and Waugh. At least twenty-four individuals are buried in the cemetery and fourteen of the headstones are still standing. Seven have toppled over or have been moved within the cemetery. Some of the headstones were _stacked in a pile, while others were leaning against trees until Mrs. Lamphere moved these headstones to the upper terrace. Each family had there own section or plot in foe cemetery. All the headstones are made of marble, except for one, which is made of cast iron.2 
Fourteen graves are those of children eighteen years old or under 3 Seven people died between the age of eighteen and forty-five and three people between the age of sixty-five and ninety-five. Eight people buried in the cemetery were victims of typhoid, consumption, or diphtheria epidemics, which spread through the area between 1850 and 1880 (Luck 1970:15). Susan, Edward, and Eliza Doran and Susannah McMannus died during the diphtheria plague of 1866, the effect of which is evident in cemeteries throughout the area. The first person to be buried in the cemetery was Margaret Kelley on July 28, 1847. The last person to be buried in the 
 
This is the headstone of James Morris, died March 7, 1831. 
2 Bridgett Gill, the wife of James Gill, died July 27, 1854 at the age of forty-five. According to Luella Lamphere, another cast iron headstone is said to.have been in the cemetery, but its whereabouts is unknown. 
3 Emily A. Doran, Eliza J. Doran, Edward L. Doran, Thomas Doran, James A. Doran, Susan E. Doran, John Carney, John McNulty, Susannah McMannus, Mary Waugh, Annie Waugh, James Waugh, Thomas Burns, and Margaret Kelley 


Earliest Burial:  
Most Recent Burial: 
 


 

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Map

St Thomas Cemetery | 1873 | Range Rd.

by Elizabeth Weichel Moore 

Some data is still being added to cemetery information, check back soon for a complete listing of information.
 

Facts

Some data is still being added to cemetery information, check back soon for a complete listing of information..


Earliest Burial:  
Most Recent Burial: 
 


 

Photos

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Contact Information

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Map

Irish Settlement Cemetery | 1851 | Irish Settlement Rd.

by Elizabeth Weichel Moore 

 

Facts

1851 Patrick Cole sells one acre ( Lot 15 , Second Subdivision) on Irish Settlement Rd to Bishop Jeremiah O'Callaghan of Boston (vol 13 p 27) 
1854 Boston to Burlington Diocese (vol 14 p 127) 
1977 Wally Stone deeds - 1 A. to Diocese (vol p 
Early burials: Peter Duffy 1851; Thomas Waugh 1851; Michael Beirnie 1851 
Burials predating first land transfer: Matthew Casey 1815; James Morris 1831; Martin Barrett 1836; Elizabeth Morris 1837; John Morris 1841 
Some data is still being added to cemetery information, check back soon for a complete listing of information.

Earliest Burial:  
Most Recent Burial: 
 


 

Photos

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Contact Information

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Map

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